men r turds

makes me miss my dog so badly ;(

makes me miss my dog so badly ;(

(Source: magicalnaturetour, via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: adamferriss)

thecreatorsproject:

Is that mirror copying you?

thecreatorsproject:

Is that mirror copying you?

(via bitforms)

(Source: feathersalwaysmakepplattractive, via feathersalwaysmakepplattractive)

weinventyou:

American Bars

weinventyou:

American Bars

sophiekahn:

Hugo Arcier: 3d printed titanium sculptures
via i.materialise http://i.materialise.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Dogma_micro_sculptures1.jpg

sophiekahn:

Hugo Arcier: 3d printed titanium sculptures

via i.materialise http://i.materialise.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Dogma_micro_sculptures1.jpg

algopop:

Protest Bots - Mark Sample
Mark Sample makes a call for Protest ‘Bots of Conviction’ and narrates his own experiences of deploying twitter bots. 

There are not many bots of conviction, but they are possible, as @ClearCongress demonstrates. It turns out I have been making agit-bots myself, though I didn’t realize it until after the horrific mass killing in Santa Barbara on May 23. I woke up the next day heartbroken and angry, so I made a bot. This seemed to be a more productive way of channeling my anger than calling Congress—hopeless, selfish Congress—about gun laws.

Mark also makes some interesting criticisms of the current bot canon that is taking shape. I have to agree, I moved away from making twitter-bots when the scene got saturated with gag-formula bots, but Mark’s words are encouraging provocations to revisit the medium.

rather than ambivalence and anguish being the key markers of canon-worthy bots, it’s absurdism, comical juxtaposition, and an exhaustive sensibility (the idea that while a human cannot tweet every word or every unicode character, a machine can). Bots that don’t share these traits—say, a bot that lists toxic chemicals in drinking water or tweets civilian deaths from drone attacks—are likely to be left out of the bot canon.

algopop:

Protest Bots - Mark Sample

Mark Sample makes a call for Protest ‘Bots of Conviction’ and narrates his own experiences of deploying twitter bots. 

There are not many bots of conviction, but they are possible, as @ClearCongress demonstrates. It turns out I have been making agit-bots myself, though I didn’t realize it until after the horrific mass killing in Santa Barbara on May 23. I woke up the next day heartbroken and angry, so I made a bot. This seemed to be a more productive way of channeling my anger than calling Congress—hopeless, selfish Congress—about gun laws.

Mark also makes some interesting criticisms of the current bot canon that is taking shape. I have to agree, I moved away from making twitter-bots when the scene got saturated with gag-formula bots, but Mark’s words are encouraging provocations to revisit the medium.

rather than ambivalence and anguish being the key markers of canon-worthy bots, it’s absurdism, comical juxtaposition, and an exhaustive sensibility (the idea that while a human cannot tweet every word or every unicode character, a machine can). Bots that don’t share these traits—say, a bot that lists toxic chemicals in drinking water or tweets civilian deaths from drone attacks—are likely to be left out of the bot canon.

babies

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via ratak-monodosico)

alansastre:


Babble #5, 2014. Acrylic and oil on canvas. 27 x 22 cm.

alansastre:

Babble #5, 2014. Acrylic and oil on canvas. 27 x 22 cm.

(via verbnoun)

secretlymisha:

it’s deeply disturbing that people are so eager to associate mental illness with mass violence, yet refuse to associate misogyny with killing women

especially when we’re talking about a white dude

(via norriei)

(Source: feathersalwaysmakepplattractive)

zbags:

click here for more soft grunge

zbags:

click here for more soft grunge

likeafieldmouse:

Matthew Day Jackson - August 9, 1945 (2011) - Scorched wood & lead on panel

(via randvares)